WESTBROOK FAMILY


NOTE: Westbrook-Gage Reunion at Hamilton, Ont. Battlefield House Museum & Park - August 23, 2009


FAMILY WEB SITES

William B
Jones born 1802


His son
William C. Jones


Milo Jones and
sons Howard,
William C. II
and Percy



Photos by W.C.
Jones II of Russian
Railway Service in
Japan 1917 - 1918


Charles Edward Jones,
Indian Scout


66th Illinois
Sharpshooters


Probable Jones
ancestors


Other Jones
Families


Morss - Morse

Raplee Coligny

Admiral Coligny


Hayward

McQuade

Hills Figgins
Smart


Smith family
of Stratford
-on-Avon


Finster

Armitage

Thorne

Weiss

Westbrook

more Westbrook
by W.E. Westbrook


web master
Dale Jones
Family


First of all, if you are a Westbrook, you are probably related.

Back in 1970 I found some records in the genealogy section of the New York City research library on 42nd street. Unfortunately, I can not find my notes on the specific source of this information. However, my conclusion that Anthony Jansen Westbrook was probably the son of Jan Theuniszoon is backed by William E. Westbrook's research as shown below.

According to my notes, Jan Theunszoon married Lychgan Bosh on March 1632. She was the daughter of Cornelius Coneliaszoon Bosch and Gerti Gossendochter. Jan's parents were Theunis Reyerszoon and Jannicheje Jansdochte, who had four children as mentioned in the period from 1621 - 1643 in Dutch records.

The Ryerszoons lived in the village of Westbrook. Jan Theunisse was a journeyman ships carpenter. I found references to West Indies Company complaints that not only did he insist on being made a master carpenter, that he demanded too much money. He left for New Amsterdam without his family and there are letters from the Netherlands asking if they "cannot convince him of his Christian duties, as his wife and two children come daily asking for sustenance." Within a year his wife and kids were sent to New Amsterdam to join him. You couldn't get away with it in those days either.


In August of 2005 I traveled to Michigan and Ontario to do some research. Mainly what I discovered was a new found respect for the lives of Anthony Westbrook and his two sons John and Andrew. A few miles north of Delaware, Ontario which is south of London, Ont., I found Andrew Westbrook's farm. It is now a race track. The town of Delaware lies on the Thames river has not yet been overun by its larger neighbor to the north. Delaware is surrounded by lush farm land. It was first settled by christian Delaware Indians. The country side and the town probably have not changed much in a couple of centuries, except for the race track.

The Thames River fronts the Westbrook farm and flow a good 200 km to Lake Saint Claire. It was this route that Westbrook took in Feb. of 1813 when he fled to the American forces in Detroit, driving his cattle before him. The sleigh went through the ice on Lake Saint Claire but it and all on board were saved. They finally made it to Fort Detroit but his wife died of exposure the next day. The fort was full of starving refugees as well as forces trying to build a navy. He and his cattle were more than welcome.

Dale Chester Westbrook Jones


History of the Westbrook Family
As prepared by William E. Westbrook, San Francisco California

Anthony Jansen Westbrook and his wife Orrseltie Dircks are the progenitors of this New York Westbrook family. They were married about 1658 or 1659. They had a tavern and resided at Flatbush on Long Island, and at Albany, New York. Their names appear in over 125 records during the period April 23, 1658 and December 22, 1678; many of these records have not been published.

We note that other persons from the village of Westbroeck, the Netherlands, contracted with Kihaen can Rensselaer for employment in the colony of Rensselaerwijck, now Albany, New York, one of whom was Jan Teunisen, a carpenter; and that Jan Teunisen may properly name his son Anthony Jansen. Anthony Jansen is the only person who adopted the surname "Westbroeck" when required to distinguish himself from other contemporary Anthony Jansens when the British controlled the colonies. He signed his full name shortly before his death. (Flatbush Town record, May 11, 1672.)

Ursel Dircks, from Holstein, with two children, was a passenger to New Netherlands in De Moesman, (the Market Gardener), and arrived May 1, 1658. She was a widow for the second time. The ages of her two children are unknown. (New York Colonial Manuscripts, V. 14 p. 83, folio 8.)

Ursel Dircks, a young daughter from Hamburg, living at the "Luevenhaven, was first married to Jan Hendricksen, a young man at Hillegersberg, near Rotterdam, on October 25, 1653, after a publication of the intended marriage on September 21, 1653. On August 29, 1655 a publication was made of the intended marriage of Tuenis Jacobs, a young man from Beeckum, living at the Nieuwe Vogelsang. (Letter, Archivaris, Gemeentearchief, Rotterdam, Nov. 15, 1968.)

While en route to join her new husband at Albany, Ursul Dircks ordered some new clothes from Anony De Lorme, corner of Goidweighers and Broad Streets, New York on April 23, 1658, and received an advance of money in silver and gold. (Flatbush Town Records, Miscellaneous Volume II, 1658-1799, Paper No. 6888,)

On November 30, 1622, Antonis Jansen paid for the use of a small pall, and on June 11, 1664, he again paid for the use of the pall. (Burial records of the 1st Dutch reformed Church of Albany 1654-1862, published in The Dutch Settlers Society of Albany Yearbook, 1932-1934, pp. 4-5.) The names of the two children are unknown.


Antony Westbrook married Sarah Dekker

Anthony Westbrook was a member of Joseph Brantts war party July 29, 1779.

(Public Papers of George Clinton, Vol. V, 1901, p. 163.) He appears with his family as a Loyalist on the Return of Persons at Niagara, 1793. (Haldimand Papers, Vol. 105, P. 395a, in the Public Archives of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.) On April 28, 1786 he submitted as Anthony Westbrook, late of Orange County, N. Y. in the dissident colonies, but now of Niagara in the Province of Quebec, a claim for relief due to the loss of his property at the time of his escape to the British Army in the year 1778, and sold by the Commissioners of the State of New York. The claim was received too late, and is on file "A. O. 13/80," (Audit Office Paper), in the Public record Office, Chancery Lane, London, England.)

Children:

284. Johannis Westbrook, bapt, Jan. 8, 1764, (Minisink Church, P. 146).

285. Alexander Westbrook, bapt. May 28, 1766, (Minisink Church, p. 149).

286. Elisabeth Westbrook, bapt, May 12, 1769, (Minisink Church, p. 156). Married first, Benjamin Beecraft, 1801; second, Allen Sage.

287. Johannis Westbrook, b. Nov. 6, 1770, Married Elizabeth Gage.

288. Aenderis Westbrook, b. June 17, 1773.

Married first, Sally Hull; second, Nancy Thorn Geel.

Andrew Westbrook deserted to the United States forces during the War of 1812, and was attainted of High Treason for "aiding and assisting the Enemy, making prisoners of His Majestys Liege subjects and compelling them to take an Oath of Neutrality. By this attainder he forfeited approximately 4000 acres of land situated in Western Ontario. He is said to have been the subject of the novel by Major John Richardson, the Canadian author, entitled "Westbrook; or the Outlaw"1 published 1851 in New York. In the 20th Congress, 1st Session, December 19, 1827, House Bill. No. 16, entitled "For the benefit of Andrew Westbrook" was reported to the effect: "A patent shall issue to Andrew Westbrook for two sections of land located on any of the unappropriated lands of the United States House Report No. 20 of the same Congress comprises the full report.

Sixth Parliament. Chaps. X & XI, 54th George III, A. D. 1814, pp. 1923t
AN ACT to declare certain persons, therein described, Aliens, and to vest their estates in His Majesty. (Passed 14th March, 1814.) Real Estate Vested in His Majesty, under the provisions of the Provincial Act of the 54th Year of George 3rd: p. 18: Containing in the whole about Four Thousand and forty Acres of Land.

Date of Inquisition: 20th January 1817.
Name of Commissioner and Date of Petition:
The Honorable Thomas Talbot, 15 Oct. 1816.

Name: Andrew Westbrook, Yeoman.
Late places of Abode: Township of Delaware, District of London.

(Ontario Department of Public Records and Archives, Toronto. it. G, 1, A IV, Vol. 16.)


The narratives, as follow, are from the history of ; St. Clair County, Michigan. Its History and its People, by William Lee Janks, Vol. I, 1912. Page 160

The settlers on the border of Lake and River St. Clair were, at the breaking out of the war, compelled to remove all their stock of horses, cattle , and hogs to Detroit ( to protect such from the Indians), when all were consumed, and while many were deliberating how, and where they were to be supplied, Captain Aandrew Westbrook went to the state of Ohio and purchased cattle, selecting such as were most required to meet the immediate wants of the inhabitants; this he continued to do until all were supplied. As Captain Westbrook was in his day a very prominent man in St. Clair county, I, (Aura P. Stewart, born in Canadaigua, N.Y., 20 May, 1804), will here mention a few incidents of his life.

Before the war with England, he was a wealthy farmer and business man, residing near the Moravian town on the river Thames. In his immediate neighborhood, there lived one Major Tawsby, who was an aspirant for government favors. At the breaking out of the war with the British government, took immediate steps to organize the militia of Canada, and at such organization Tawsby received a major's commission, and Westbrook was offered a captain's commission under Tawsby, which he immediately refused. Westbrook was born in the state of New York and his sympathies were with the American cause; and he, on the appointment of his enemy, Tawsby, determined to leave Canada and join the Americans; he had counted the consequences of this act; and, knowing that the confiscation of his valuable property would follow, he collected his goods together and all that he could not remove, he burned with his house and barn.

On Westbrook's arrival in Detroit, he stated his case to Governor Hull and received a Captain's commission as was found to be a very useful man in the commissary department in collecting supplies for the troops. There were many reconnoitering parties sent up the river Thames during the war, or before the surrender of Detroit, and Captain Westbrook, learning that Major Tawsby was at home, surrounded his house and took him prisoner. The hatred that Westbrook and Tawsby bore towards each other was mutual and violent. After this reconnoitering party had gone into camp for the night, and the guns all stacked, Tawsby seized a musket and made a lunge at Westbrook with intent to kill him, but in the act he stumbled and the bayonet entered Westbrook's boot; for this act Tawsby was put in irons until he reached Detroit.

Captain Westbrook, at the close of the war, purchased a farm of a Frenchman joining the Rocor farm and other lands adjoining from which he made on of the best farms then in St. Clair county. Our first representatives in congress from the territory of Michigan made know to that body the loss of Captain Westbrook's property in Canada, and on such representatives an act was passed granting him two sections of land, which he selected mostly in the township of Clay, in St. Clair county, which lands passed through several purchases and now comprise the valuable farms of Sava and Dana Richardson.
Pioneers of St Clair county adds; "Through the influence of Major Tawsby, Captain Westbrook was imprisoned twice. The first charge was that "Hulls proclamation was found in his house," which was not considered sufficient evidence to hold him. The second time, a false charge was framed to imprison him. He was assisted by friends to escape to Detroit.

In June 1826, Thomas L. McKenney, United States commissioner of Indian affairs, on this way from Detroit to the Indian tribes near the head waters of the Missippi in the schooner "Ghent" was becalmed not far from the Westbrook farm. In company with Colonel Oroghan, Westbrooks old commander, McKenney called upon Westbrook, whom he described as being:

"about six feet two inches tall, his hair once sandy or rather fox colored, but the fierceness of the reddish cast now softened by an intermixture of gray. A fine face, the features moderate in size, and well proportioned, the expression of the countenance mild but firm. He has a quick moving intelligent eye; his form is good, with broad shoulders and chest. He has no education, yet talks well and is precise and graphic in his expressions." He was then in his fifty fifth year, married to his second wife, and had a family of fourteen children, (four of their step children named Geel). If he once resolves upon the accomplishment of any object he is sure to realize it; the means are more materials to be judged of by his conceptions of right, and these are generally made to obey the impulses of the moment come from what quarter or involve what consequences they may."
He died in 1835 at the age of 64.



F. Douglas Reville's History of the County of Brant, 1920, Vol. 1, page 253:


The circumstances under which the Westbrooks came to Brant County possessed all the elements of romance. On or about the close of the Revolutionary War, two brothers, John and Alexander Westbrook, whose parents resided in New York State, were in the fields, or woods, looking after their horses. Some of the Six Nations Indians who were engaged on a marauding expedition in the State named, took them prisoners, and they were brought to the territory now known as Brant County. They were kept by the red men for two or three years and were well treated, but were ultimately taken to the Niagara frontier and turned over to the Americans in an exchange of prisoners.

They at once returned home where they were received as if from the dead, all hope regarding them having long since been abandoned. However, as they were so impressed with the surroundings of their enforced habitation that about the year of 1782, or 1783 they persuaded their father, (Anthony) to come here and settle. After many days of travel they finally reached their new home, located on Fairchilds Creek. John served with distinction in the war of 1812 and became a major. He was on terms of great intimacy with Brant. Strong and stalwart of frame he was the stuff out of which pioneers were made, and he considered it no hardship to ride, as he often did with his grist, on horseback to the mill at Niagrara .

He married Elizabeth Gage whose mother was of a notable type. Mary Jones before her marriage was at the time of her coming to Canada the widow of a loyalist officer, John Gage who had been killed during the fighting. Even at this early day she had relatives in Canada and her brother, Augustus Jones, was a well known surveyor who had taken a bride among the Six Nations. Their son Peter was afterwards the well known missionary chief.

The young widow resolved to come to the Dominion with her two children, James born in 1774 and Elizabeth, born in 1776. Placing them and a few belongings in a canoe she made her way along the old time water route to Canada; traveling up the Mohawk, past Fort Stanwix, (now Rome, N.Y.) across the short portage to Wood Creek, down Oneida Lake and the Oswego River and thence along the Southern shore of Lake Ontario to Niagara and the head of the lake at Stoney Creek.

She settled in Saltfleet Township and cleared the land and tilled the soil until her son James was old enough to shoulder the responsibilities of the farm. This heroic woman died about 1839 in Hamilton at the home of her son, when she was nearly a hundred years old. The marriage of her daughter to Major Westbrook took place in 1796. They had a family of sixteen children, their numerous descendants constituting many prominent and well know families in the city and the county. Alexander moved to what is now Brantford, in 1817. He resided on a hill near Lorne Bridge, in a log hut overlooking the river Waterford and for some time carried mail on foot and on horseback between Anacaster and Oakland. He finally settled in Oakland. Haggai, another brother, also lived in Oakland.
More on Mary Jones

Another son of Anthony Westbrook was Andrew, who became quite celebrated and in 1815 was attained for High treason for "aiding and assisting the Enemy, making Prisoners of His Majesty's liege subjects and compelling them to take an Oath of Neutrality." By this attainder he forfeited approximately 4,000 acres of land situated in what is western Ontario.






Eighteenth Report of the Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario, 1929, page 38, Land Book A. 29th June, 1793.

John Westbrook. . . Anthony Westbrook

Memorial that having made the settlements on which they live adjoining the west line of Township No. 8, near the road lately laid out from the head of Lake Ontario to the River La Tranche, that they were encouraged by the land board and Acting Surveyor to settle upon those lands four years before they were surveyed, which proves now to be reserved lands, your partitioners pray that the same may be confirmed to them. ordered that they be confirmed in the possession of their lands and that the Surveyor be directed to make reserves for the Crown in some other part of the Township.




Letter Feb. 22, 1937, Niagara Historical Society, Niagara-on-the-Lake:
In our #39 a list supplied be lieut. Col. A. S. De Peyster to General Haldiman, July 21, 1784, of those on this side of the river recieving rations, but lands not yet drawn for, Anthony Westbrook is among those of Brant's Volunteers.



Eighteenth Report of the Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario, 1929, page 77, Land Book A. 28th June, 1794. Alexander and Sarah Westbrook. Petitioners are the son and widow of a loyalist who served during the war in the Indian Department under Captain Brant. Prays for four hundred acres of land in the Township of Ancaster. Ordered that the same be granted.

The following pages were sent to me by the son of a neighbor of my aunt Ada Finster. Adah had left this manuscript and other materials with her girlfriend when she moved to Bermuda in the fifties. When the woman died, her son contacted me through my Finster website.

I am grateful to Mr. William E Westbrook, the author, for his very thorough research on the Westbrook family and to Richard A. MacLeod for sending me this material. This is only a portion of some 17 pages of single spaced 11 x 13 pages typed with carbon paper on onion skin paper. As they were typed in 1937, they were delicate, translucent and clung tenaciously to its folded form. I used Omnipage OCR to read them. Obviously he made only a few copies of this material.

Of particular interest is the story of Andrew Westbrook who was attained for High Treason during the War of 1812, as well as listing of his estate as distributed at his death.

Dale C Jones - webmaster


Letter Enclosed With Westbrook Material

Jefferson Barracks
Saint Louis, Missouri
December, 1937

Greetings at Christmas-time.

Cordially,
William E Westbrook

In a manner of a history report, to those who are interested in family stock, mention of the original ancestor Anthony Jansen (Westbrook), who first appears 1659 in Albany, colony of New York, is as follows:

Minutes of the Court of Fort Orange and Beverwyck, 1657-1660, Vol. 2, page 311.
New Netherland Register, 1865, page 110.
Van Rensselaer Bowier Manuscripts, 1908, page 833.
Early Records of the city and county of Albany and colony of Rensselaerswyck, Vol. 3, pages 87, 131, 134, 140, 148, 171, 174, 177,185, 200, 257, 253, 302, 305, 311.
The power of attorney August 18, 1662, (page 177, E. R. A.) is available at Rotterdam, Netherlands, bearing date April 3, 1652.
Early Records of the city and county of Albany and colony of Rensselaerswyck, 1869, pages 64, 86, 273, 352, 366, 393, 397, 403, 442. The same in Collections on the History of Albany, Vol. 3, 1870, pages 64, 86; Idem, Vol. 4, 1871, pages 136, 196, 273, 352, 366, 393, 397, 403, 442.
Minutes of the court of Albany, Rensselaerswyck, and Schenectady, 16681673, Vol. 1, pages 25, 26, 27, 35, 53, 59, 216.
N. Y. G. & B. R., 1933, Vol. 64, Page 309. First Settlers of ye plantations of Piscataway and Woodbridge, Part 6, page 1235.
Compendium of American Genealogy, Vol. 4, page 694.
Burial Records of Dutch Church at Albany, New York, published in Dutch Settlers Society of Albany, New York Yearbook, 1932-1934
Vol. 1 of Joel Munsell's Collections on the History of Albany, 1865, in accounts of Deacons of the Dutch Reformed Church, pages 7, 20, 24, 27
Accounts of colony of Rensselaerswyck, Oct. 31, 1665.
New York Colonial Manuscripts, Vol. 14, pages 60, 61, 78, 79.
His wife Orseltie Dirxs, is mentioned in Ulster County, Kingston, New York, Court Records, May 21, 1674, Feb. 12, 1677, and in Year Book of Holland Society of New York, 1902, Vol. 15, page 6.
Passengers to New Netherland, and in Baptism No. 166, Kingston, New York, Dec. 22, 1678.


Anthony Jansen Westbroeck, first found Albany, colony of New York, 1659, his wife Orrseltie Dircks. Of their children, a son, Johannes Westbrook.

Johannes Westbrook, born in Albany, married Magdalena Janse Dekker. Banns recorded 12 May 1687. Page 509, Kingston Church, marriage No. 84. Of their children, a son, Antoni Westbrook, baptized April 17, 1692. Baptism No. 702, Kingston Church.

Will of Johannes Westbrook, of Knightsfield, (Warwarsing) Liber 10, page 422, Ulster County wills is dated Jan. 25, 1725/6, names "my eldest son; Anthony." Will proved April 10, 1727. The same, in Collections of New York Historical Society, 1893, page 382. The same, in Vol. 2 N. Y. & G. R., page 202. The same, in Ulster County Probate records, Vol. 2. 1906, by Gustave Anjou, page 112.)

Antoni Westbroeck, baptized April 17, 1692 married Aaltjen Van Etten, of Hurley, April 30, 1714. Page 529, Kingston marriage No. 313. Of their children, a son, Johannes Westbroeck, born at Nytsfield, baptized Feb 24, 1717. Page 118, Kingston baptism No. 2477.

Will of Anthony Westbrook, (30S) at Trenton, 21. J., dated June 25, 1755, proved Feb. 24., 1759, names "son Johannis Westbrook."

Johannes Westbrook. Junior, married Magdalena Westbrook, March 31,. 1738, page 265, Minsink Church. Of their children, a son, Anthonie westbrook, born Sept. 2, 1738, bapt. Oct. 31, 1738. Page 99, Minisink Church.


MAIN BODY OF TEXT
Anthonie Westbrook, married Sara Decker. Of their children, a son, Andrew Westbrook, born or bapt. June 17, 1773, Aenderis.

American Archives, Fourth Series, Vol. 3, 1840, page 590: Signers in Goshen, Orange County, New York Association, June 8, 1775: Samuel Westbrook, Anthony Westbrook.

On page 258, New York in the Revolution as Colony and State, Vol. II, 1904, under Estates Confiscated, is shown: Anthony Westbrook.

The Centennial of the Settlement of Upper Canada, by the United Empire Loyalists, 1885, gives on page 272, Appendix B, Copy of the "Old U. E. List." Anthony Westbrook, Residence H. district. A wife and four children.(Provision List Niagara) Stamped Book, Niagara. Page 330, shows Andrew Westbrook, son of Anthony.

American Loyalists. Audit Office Papers. Vol. 4, page 109. Claims Received too late. Anthony Westbrook (New York) gives memorial statement of losses of effects with affidavit sworn 28 April 1786. Inventory of effects belonging to Sarah Westbrook sold by commissioners of state of New York and certified as sold as confiscated effects of claimant who was with the British at the time of the sale. Samuel Westbrook and Mary Westbrook, 18 June 1786. (Anthony Westbrook had a brother Samuel who married Maria Van Aken.)

Eighteenth Report of the Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario, 1929, Grants of Crown Lands in Upper Canada, page 77, 28th June 1794. Alexander and Sarah Westbrook: Petitioners are the son and widow of a loyalist who served during the war in the Indian Department under Captain Brant. Prays for four hundred acres of land in the Township of Ancaster. Ordered that the same be granted

. Nineteenth Report of the Department of Public Records and Archives of Ontario, 1930, Grants of Crown Lands in Upper Canada, page 45, Petitions read on the 13th July, 1796: No. 121. Andrew Westbrook. Stating that he is son to Anthony Westbrook, who served with Capt. Brant during the American War, and praying for 400 acres of land, having never received any, Recommended for 300 acres on producing a certificate for service.

History of the County of Brant, Ontario, 1920, Vol. 1, page 253:
Another son of Anthony Westbrook was Andrew, who became quite celebrated for his exploits during the war of 1812. He deserted to the United States forces and in 1815 was attainted of High Treason for "aiding and assisting the Enemy, making Prisoners of His Majesty's liege Subjects and compelling them to take an Oath of Neutrality."


By this attainder he forfeited approximately 4,000 acres of land situated in what is now Western Ontario. Andrew Westbrook is said to have been the subject of a novel by Major John Richardson, the Canadian author, entitled "Westbrook; or the Outlaw" which was published in New York.


Note by webmaster, Dale Jones:   Richardson published this as a serial story in a New York newspaper while he was literally starving to death in New York City. It was discovered a few years back and published in book form. A copy of this book is in the New York public library. I have read it and it appears to be a rather fanciful portrait of a monster who feeds his own grandchild to the wolves. It is hardly a work of art, more like what used to be called a pot boiler. It does, however reveal the extent of Richardson's hatred for the man who is reputed to have tared and feathered him. Perhaps Westbrook was a pre-emptive literary critic.

The narratives, as follow, are from the history of: St. Clair County, Michigan. Its History and its People, by William Lee Jenks, Vol. I, 1912.

Page 160. The settlers on the border of Lake and River St. Clair were, at the breaking out of the war, compelled to remove all their stock of horses, cattle, and hogs to Detroit (to protect such from the Indians), where all were consumed; and while many were deliberating how, and where they were to be supplied, Captain Andrew Westbrook went to the state of Ohio and purchased cattle, selecting such as were most required to meet the immediate wants of the inhabitants; this he continued to do until all were supplied.

As Captain Westbrook was in his day a very prominent man in St. Clair county, I (Aura P. Stewart, born Canandaigua, id. Y. 20 May, 1804), will here mention a few incidents of his life. Before the war with England, he was a wealthy farmer and business man, residing near the Moravian town on the River Thames; in his immediate neighborhood, there lived one Major Tawsby, who was an aspirant for government favors. At the breaking out of the war the British government, took immediate steps to organize the militia of Canada, and at such organization Tawsby received a major's commission, and Westbrook was offered a captain's commission under Tawsby, which he indignantly refused.

Westbrook was born in the state of New York, and his sympathies were with the American cause; and he, on the appointment of his enemy, Tawsby, determined to leave Canada and join the Americans; he had counted the consequences of this act; and, knowing that the confiscation of his valuable property would follow, he collected his goods together, and all that he could not remove he burned with his house and barn. On Westbrook's arrival in Detroit, he stated his case to Governor Hull and received a Captain's Cormission, and was found to be a very useful man in the commissary department in collecting supplies for the troops. There were many reconnoitering parties sent up the River Thames during the war, or before the surrender of Detroit, and Captain Westbrook was a valuable guide to such parties. On one of these expeditions, Captain Westbrook. learning that Major Tawsby was at home, surrounded his house, and took him prisoner. The hatred that Westbrook and Tawsby bore toward each other was mutual and violent.

After this reconnoitering party had gone into camp for the night, and the guns all stacked, Tawsby seized a musket and made a lunge at Westbrook with intent to kill him, but in the act he stumbled and the bayonet entered Westbrook's boot; for this act Tawsby was put in irons until he reached Detroit.

Captain Westbrook, at the close of the war, purchased a farm of a Frenchman joining the Recor farm, and other lands adjoining, from which he made one of the best farms then in St. Clair county.

Our first representatives in congress from the territory of Michigan made known to that body the loss of Captain Westbrook's property in Canada, and on such representation an act was passed granting him two suctions of land, which he selected mostly in the town ship of Clay, in St. Clair county, which lands passed through several purchasers, and now comprise the valuable farms of Seva and Dana Richardson.

Pioneers of St. Clair County adds: Through the influence of Major Tawsby, Captain Westbrook was imprisoned twice, The first charge was that "Hull's proclamation was found in his house," which was not considered sufficient evidence to hold him. The second time, a false charge was framed to imprison him. He was assisted by friends to escape to Detroit. Note. (Captain Westbrook's 's property was not confiscated until 30 years afterwards, and it was promised to his heirs that if they would return and become English subjects, the property would be restored.) (1842)

Page 106. First County Commissioners. Shortly after the proclamation organizing the county, Governor Cass performed the duty of appointing the county commissioners, and he selected Andrew Westbrook, George Cottrell and John K. Smith. This was a trio of notable pioneers. Andrew Westbrook was a native of Massachusetts, born in 1771, and while a child, was taken by his father to Nova Scotia, When about twelve years of age he came with his parents to Delaware, on the Thomas, Upper Canada, where, as he grew to middle age, he acquired considerable wealth, several thousand acres of land, and good buildings, including a distillery, which seems to have been in those days a not uncommon property.

When the War of 1812 broke out he was offered a commission a captain in the Canadian militia, but refused, and came to Detroit, and offered his services to Governor Hull, which were accepted, and he performed many and valuable services as captain of a company of scouts. The British official dispatches of the time contain frequent references to the "traitor Westbrook" as they almost invariably term him.

Shortly after leaving his home to join the American Army, his merchandise was destroyed by the British, and a company of American Soldiers was sent to bring away such of the remaining personal property as they could. Westbrook accompanied the force, and as the enemy was near, he himself set fire to his buildings and property to prevent their use by the British. His landed property for which he had paid over thirteen thousand dollars, was confiscated by the British government.

He had at the time five children, and after the war, came up the St. Clair river in 1815 and purchased two private claims, Nos. 243, and 303, in what is now the township of East China, and soon became the largest and most prosperous farmer in the district. He became a considerable owner of land in the county, buying among other tracts a part of what became the Fort Gratiot Military Reservation, which he sold to the government and about 200 acres in the south part of section 15 in the city of Port Huron In 1828 congress passed an act granting him two sections of land in consideration of his services in the War of 1812, and he selected the largest part of it from public lands in the township of Clay.

While this county was still a part of Macomb county he was appointed by Governor Cass, supervisor of highways.

His first wife having died in 1815, he married Nancy Thorn, daughter of William Thorn and sister of Major John Thorn, and after her death married Margaret Ann Crawford, whom he divorced in 1834 and he subsequently married a fourth time.

In June, 1826, Thomas L. McKenney, United States commissioner of Indian affairs, on his way from Detroit to the Indian tribes near the head waters of the Missippi in the schooner "Ghent," was becalmed not far from the Westbrook farm. In company with Colonel Crpghan, Westbrook's old commander, McKenney called upon Westbrook, whom he described as being "about six feet two inches tall, his hair once sandy or rather fox-colored, but the fierceness of the reddish cast now softened by an intermixture of gray. A fine face, the features moderate in size, and well proportioned, the expression of the countenance mild but firm. He has a quick moving intelligent eye; his form is good, with broad shoulders and chest. He has no education, yet talks well and is precise; and graphic in his expressions." He was then in his fifty-fifth year, married to his second wife, and had a family of fourteen children, (four of their step-children named Geel). "If he once resolves upon the accomplishment of any object he is sure to realize it; the means are more materials to be judged of by his conceptions of right, and these are generally made to obey the impulses of the moment come from what quarter or involve what consequences they may. He died in 1835. Michigan Pioneer and Historical Collections, Vol. 13, p. 504: Mr. McMillan, whose widow and children after the lapse of forty years are yet with us, had joined Capt. Andrew Westbrook's company of rangers. Capt. Westbrook was a native of Massachusetts and had been taken in his childhood by his father to Nova Scotia. He afterwards found his way to Delaware, on the Thames in Upper Canada, where he was living when the war of 1812 broke out. He was too much of a Yankee to be quiet, and they drove him off. He came to Michigan raised a company of rangers, and proved an exceedingly active partisan soldier, and seriously annoyed the enemy. He made frequent incursions into the Province; as far up as Delaware.

He was at the time a man of considerable wealth, had a fine large house, distillery, etc., at Delaware. On his first visit with his rangers, he called them around him at his own place, and, swinging a fire brand around his head, said: "Boys, you have just fifteen minutes to plunder my premises, after that I give them to the flames; and true to his word he applied the brand and burned the whole concern. Capt. Westbrook afterwards settled on the beautiful banks of the river St. Clair, where we have often experienced the generous hospitality of "Baronial hall;" we usually called him Baron Steuben. (In Detroit in 1814, written in 1853). (The: same, in Early Days in Detroit" by Friend Palmer, p. 18).

The War of 1812

M.P. & H. C. , Vol. 15, p. 489: (War- 1812). . York February 14th 1814 .... The Enemy appeared, on Monday the 31st Ultimo, in some force at Delaware; and made prisoners of Captain Springer, and a small guard of Militia, posted at (Westbrooks), for the security of his property, he, Westbrook having gone over to the Enemy. - Westbrook was with the Enemy; and, before they retired, he burnt his buildings himself .... p.490. .... and the outrage committed in the burning of the house and barn of Mr. Westbrook at that place, .... (Delaware).

p.500. (War of 1812) Lieut. Col. Butler to Maj. Gen. P. Riall. Detroit (M. T.) 5 March 1814. Sir. By the return of Lieut Jackson of the Royal Scotts, who has been the Bearer of your flag of truce, from Delaware (U: C.) to this place, I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22nd ulto:, accompanied by a transcript of the communication made to you by lieut General Drummond on the day preceeding relative to the burning of Mr. Westbrook's barn and house, and tto the Capture of Messr. Baby, Springer, and Bringham by a detatchment of troops from my command at Detroit. In the communication made to you by lieut: General Drummond, he has fallen into some errors it will be my duty to correct. The first complaint exhibited against the conduct of the detachment, is for, "the outrage committed in burning the House & Barn of Mr. Westbrook" When it shall be known that Mr. Westbrook, was -4 a man born within the states, and retaining the attachment for his native country which a citizen ought to feel, and for which since the commencement of the present war, he has suffered from Your Government, oppression, imprisonment, and persecution, in fact has been virtually outlawed; one is at a loss to imagine the source whence the extreme sensibility in regard to this mans rights, should be so suddenly felt and displayed. "But when it is added that Mr. Westbrook (who was fugitive from your limits) accompanied the detachment and counted its protection in the removal of his family from Delaware, and that he was himself the principal actor in the "Outrage" complained of, it is presumed that no repitition of this complaint will be heard. .... H. Butler Lt Col: U. S. Army Comg Michigan Territory & its dependencies.

M.P. & H.C. Vol. 15, p. 589: War-1812. Lieut. Gen. Drummond to Sir George Prevost. Kingston June 7th 1814. Sir, By a report I have received from the Right Division, I find that the Traitor Westbrook, who formerly lived near Delaware Town, made his appearance with about 30 Rifleman of the enemy at Port Talbot, on the evening of the 30th ultimo; where they made Prisoners Capt. Wilson of the Militia & the Miller, as also Capt. Patterson at the house of Col. Talbot. The miller effected his escape; but the others were obliged to take an oath similar to that administered to the Inhabitants of the new settlement, under pain of their houses being immediately burnt as well as all others in the neighborhood. This party come from the westward; did but little damage; and returned after a very short stay, through apprehension of their retreat being cut off, by the assembling of the Militia, on the information of the man who made his escape. I have the honor to be Sir Your Excellency's most obedient humble servant Gordon Drummond Lt. General. (to) His Excellency Sir Geo. Prevost Bart &c &c &c. (The same, Documentary History of campaign on Niagara Frontier in year 1812 by Capt. E. Cruikshank.)

M.P. & H.C., Vol. 15, p.640. War-1812. Camp Before Fort Erie September 5th 1814. .... The Traitor Westbrook accompanied this gang. .... Westbrook being in the rear conducted them safe off through the Woods. .... p.651. September 19th 1814 .... a body of the Enemy returned to Port Talbot, on the 9th Inst:, accompanied by Traitor Westbrook, and some Indians. .... M.P. & H.C., Vol. 32, p. 472. 1814. 22d March. Westbrook called with Major Tonsley of the Militia who he took prisoner in his House far up in the river Thames, in the night of the 18th Inst. July 13th. Towards night this day two American soldiers armed with their Rifles told me they were sent by Mr. Westbrook to take away my Puyball Horse. 21st. Westbrook with his party who went some time ago to river Thames, now returned, he brought LaGrave Prisoner with him.

Documentary History of campaign on Niagara Frontier in year 1812 by Capt. E. Cruikshank Capt. Daniel Springer Ist Middlesex Militia to Capt. Talbot. Delaware 10th Sept. 1812. Dear Sir: Agreeable to your request I delivered your letter to Col. Nichol of Detroit, and he was much engaged with public business and did not write, but told me he would set off for Niagara on the 8th inst. I found persons of respectability in Detroit who were willing to give the depositions respecting Andrew Westbrook while at Detroit. The purport is that he requested 50 men from Gen. Hull to return back to Delaware and take his property and that Simon Z. Watson was to be one of them. Gen. Hull doubted his integrity and asked the opinion of those persons, as they were acquainted with aim, what kind of a man he was, whether or not he could be trusted; and he was in Detroit at the time of the capitulation. As there were no magistrates appointed to take depositions I could not get them, but Col. Nichol promised that they would be taken, and he would get them forwarded to Niagara.

page 193, Cruikshank, Doc. Hist. of Canada tells of raiding party "The traitor Westbrook accompanied the gang." Page 224 gives an account of another raiding party accompanied by Westbrook on Sept. 5th, 1814. Page 397. Lieut. Chas. Ingersoll, Provincial Light Dragoons to Capt. Wlm. Hamilton Merritt, Grand River (undated) . Henry Young deserted last night. Westbrook came up the same evening and made Major Tewsley prisoner. He left his compliments for Capt. Caldwell saying he would visit Oxford again with a party of Indians.

pg.182,St.Clair County Hist. On March 28, 1816, Adjutant-General McDougall established a new River St. Clair company to comprehend the Point au Tremble and the Belle river settlements, and appointed Joseph Mini, captain; Henry Cottrell, lieutenant; and William Brown ensigns of a company raised along St. Clair river. In August, 1818, Governor Cass appointed Andrew Westbrook captain; Henry Cottrell, lieutenant, and Lambert Beaubien, Victor Morass and William Brown ensigns, of a company raised along the St Clair river. In May, 1819, William Brown was promoted to lieutenant and David Cottrell to ensign.

It was at a "training' or a meeting of the company, held in the fall of this year, that an episode occurred which throws some light on the manners of the time. The captain was the Andrew Westbrook who had acted as leader of a company of rangers in the War of 1812, and probably never practiced and did not believe in military discipline. Two of the private soldiers had some difficulty which they proposed to settle by a fight, which Brown prevented, although it was encouraged by the captain, who then charged Brown with disobeying his superior officer. Brown then laid charges before Major John Stockton, of Mt. Clemens, who had Westbrook brought before a court martial in August 1820. The record of the court has not been preserved, but Brown resigned in October, 1820, and Westbrook remained as captain. .... in February, 1825, Samuel Wilson seems to have succeeded Westbrook as captain of the upper company.

p.173. Another circumstance by which Mr. Brown met the approval of the military authorities happened in the fall of 1819. The militia of St. Clair was commanded by ' Captain Westbrook and Lieutenant William Brown. While engaged in a training, two of the militia men quarreled and wanted to fight, but were prevented by Lieutenant Brown. Captain Westbrook said, let them fight if they wish, which remark bought a quarrel between the captain and the lieutenant. Westbrook charged Brown with disobeying a superior officer. Brown appeared before the commander-in-chief, who dis charged Westbrook and appointed Brown captain in his place.

(The same, M. P. & H. C. Vol. 4, p. 348.) M. P, & H. C., Vol, 6, p: 406: The first board or court of county commissioners as they styled themselves, composed of Andrew Westbrook, George Cottrell, and John K. Smith, held its first regular meeting June 4, 1821. Andrew Westbrook was then the largest land owner and farmer in the county. His farm on the banks of the St. Clair, a little above the mouth of Belle river, was a model, and the source of a large income for those early days, He came into the county before, and remained during the war of 1812, maintaining a position that enabled him to reap large profits from the disturbed and uncertain times, He was a man of considerable ability, and looked up to as one of the wealthiest and most prominent citizens.

p.407. A county jail was built that year (1821) under contract with James Fulton 'in the rear of his house" at a cost of thirty-five dollars; Andrew Westbrook furnishing the hinges and bolts at the price of 25 cents per pound, amounting to $6.63 in addition to the $35 paid Fulton; after ordering the payment of these sums the court adjourned. p.412.: Highways had been laid out and partly worked, along the river bank from J. Y. Smith's place in Algonac most of the way to Black river, and one up Black river to the morass mills (Clyde), of which John H. Westbrook was road-master.

p.116. Miscellaneous County Legislation (1824-1827). At the meeting in June of this year, (1824) there being present Andrew Westbrook and George Cottrell, the board generously voted unaminously to deduct two thousand dollars from the assessed valuation of Andrew Westbrook's taxable property. It may be that this was to partially compensate for the expected loss of salary. (the salary of the commissioners of St. Clair county at ten dollars, .... this reduction to one-third the former salary met no opposition from the officials themselves.) p.117, At the meeting

March 7, 1825, the entire board was present. At this meeting Mr. Westbrook, received his delayed allowance as commissioner .... p.131. Assessment Roll for 1821. #77, Andrew Westbrook, 100 Improved lands, 700 wild Lands, 2 houses, 1 barn, 2 horses under three years, 4 horses over three years, 8 oxen, 10 cows, 8 young cattle, 8 hogs, 130 house furniture, Valuation 3540. In addition to the property named and valued in above list, 1'I. Thorn and Andrew Westbrook, each a cariole; A. Westbrook a silver watch, and a. Westbrook, a cart.

#77. Andrew Westbrook, the wealthiest man in the county, owned Claims 243, and 303, besides a very considerable amount of personal property. Andrew Westbrook was possessed of the largest amount of household furniture $130 and the only taxpayer approaching him in that line was William Brown, with $100 in amount.

M.P. & H.C., Vol. 1, p.443. Capt. Andrew Westbrook had a very large and good farm, yielding some $5,000 worth of produce annually, which he exchanged for lumber, shingles, etc.

p.172. Pioneer Steamboats. Within the past two decades, a multitude of boats and vessels have been built at .Marine City, but the first vessel built on Belle river was the "Pilot." and was owned by Cants;

n -6p.122. First Bridges Built. At the spring election in 1831 Harvey Stewart was elected supervisor of Clay township, Amasa Hemminger of Cottrellville, Andrew Westbrook, the former county commissioner, of St. Clair (Sinclair as the name of a town nip never afterwards appears, although no legal steps were taken to make the change) and John Kenelly of Desmond, and they constituted the board at a special session held May 9, 1831.

M. P. & H.C., Vol. 13, p.335. The new light house was built of brick, and while in process of construction the keeper and deputy occupied a house south of the fort, owned by Andrew Westbrook.

p.74. Claims presented to Land Board 1808. #243, lean Marie Beaubien, 16 acres by 40. Allowed upon the testimony of Toussiant Chovin. .... This tract was in 1815 sold to Andrew Westbrook, who occupied it as his home farm. p.97. ....the government was forced to purchase, in 1833, from Andrew Westbrook, and A. J. desnoyers, the owners of the Bonhomme claims, their rights. (site of Fort Gratiot).

M.P. & H.C., Vol. 11, p.252. A considerable portion of the reserve was owned by Andrew Westbrook, who sold it to the government for the consideration of $800, May 7, 1833. This is described as ø'a. tract of land fronting on the river St. Clair and extending back in a line with the present Fort Gratiot to Black River, being the lower or southern moiety or half part of a tract of land which was confirmed by the board of land commissioners for said territory to Pierre Beaubien, and afterwards conveyed by said Beaubien to Charles Larned, Esq., and by said Larned conveyed to said Westbrook." This tract covered the northerly part of the reserve, and the plat referred to indicates that one Desnoyers owned, under one Bonhomme, a building situate to the south of the Westbrook land and west of the fort.

p136. #70. William Thorn owned Claim 253 and was the father of John Thorn and several other children: Nancy, wife of James Geel; (afterward married Andrew Westbrook).

M. P. & H.C., Vol. l, p.442. Old Captain Thorn occupied a place above Harrow's. He had two sons, William and John. The other (daughter) became the wife of Andrew Westbrook.

p.486. Residents of St. Clair County according to Census of 1830. The resodents of Clay township with number of members in their respective families are; Ebenezer Westbrook, 5, (son of Andrew). Residents of Desmond township: John H. Westbrook, 4, (son of Andrew). Residents in St. Clair township: Andrew Westbrook, 10, Andrew H. Westbrook, 7, (son).

p.147. Early Algonac. In 1826 Ira Marks and Ebenezer Westbrook bought land in section 10 and the latter later took a very active part in the building of the first Methodist Episcopal church at Algonac - the first Protestant church building in the county-- doing most of the collecting of the subscriptions and donating the land for the site.

p.313. How the M. E. Church was Built. "We, the undersigned, do agree to pay to a committee that may be appointed by the Methodist E. Church, the sums by us subscribed for the purpose of building a Methodist Meeting House at or near Point Dechan, to be paid when called upon. January 10th, A. D. 1830.'ø List of Subscribers, Amount Subscrobed. Ebenezer Wesbrook, in lumber and labor Q15.00. Remarks. Unsettled. Mary Marsen, 20s to be paid in cider $2,50, Paid to E. Wesbrook and T. Peer, not accounted for James & Palmer, in sawed lumber, 1 M feet $6.00. Paid to E. Wesbrook, 1 II feet $6.00. A. H. Wesbrook, in lumber $16.00. Paid 2 M of boards $15.00. {Andrew Hull, eldest son of Capt. A.)

J. H. Westbrook, 1 M feet lumber $6.00. Paid in lumber $6.00 (John Hull, Abbottsford). The following is a statement of appropriations made for said M. E. chapel: p.316. E. Wesbrook, retained 4.5 shingles $4.50. E. Wesbrook, received of J. F. Bassett his subscription $1.50. E. Wesbrook received boards on hand $10.00. p.316. The building, after all, was found to be too small and was abandoned and later used as a dwelling and finally burned September 21, 1878.

_7_ M.P. & H: G. , Vol. 2, p.445. Dr. Hollister and Romeo Academy. of those coming from out of town .... Hiss Westbrook (1835).

M. P. & H.C., Vol. 4, p.51. .... a few names of those who settled in our township (Shiawassee pioneer life) in the summers of 1836 and 1837 -- Westbrook.

p.480. Appendix A. Civil War Soldiers from St. Clair County. Charles H. Westbrook, (Veteran) Deserted. Martin V. B. Westbrook. Enlisted in Company H, (reorganized), Third Infantry, Aug. 27, 3864. (Son of John Hull).

William, or Simson Westbrook. Enlisted in Company E, Tenth Infantry, as Sergeant, Nov. 10, 1861. (Son of William Thorn).

M.P. & H.C., Vol. 8, p. 662 Civil Officers. Andrew Westbrook, Super'r Highways. Date of Commission 7 & 8 Jan., 1817, Page of Executive Journal, 24.

p.250. St. Clair township-Supervisors, Andrew Westbrook, 1832-4. p.236. Clyde township. Supervisors: 1857, Oliver Westbrook. p.243. Kenockee township. Supervisors: 1902-08, Jefferson G. Brown. p.436. County Clerks, 1909, Jefferson G. Brown.

M.P: & H.C , Vol. 6, p.185. The great fire of July 12th, 1872. The principal losses, as given by the Pioneer, were .... Mrs. H. G. Westbrook, $1000. M.P. & H:C., Vol. 29, p. 182. Among the first American settlers of Clay township was ..:: John K,,Smith, Ora P. Stewart, George Harrow, Jacob Pier, Eben Westbrook :.,: and others named among the patentees of United States lands in the township. M.P. & H.C., Vol. 21, p.64. Memorial Report, Calhoun County. December 18, 1891, Abram Westbrook, residence Clarendon. M,P. & H.C., Vol. 29, p.475, Memorial Report, Tuscola County. Eliza Westbrook, Residence, Caro, Date of death: Feb. 4, 1900, age 54, a native of Michigan.

Friend Palmer, p.447, Westbrook was a noted character on the river in those days. It was said he had served under Gen. Scott in the war of 1812, and that he had been captain of a privateer in the early part of that war. He was rugged appearing, and - of great stature, reminding me of Capt. Blake.

I saw him often in after years, and every time I saw him, the conviction grew on me that he really might have been what they said, though it was no disgrace. Captain Andrew Westbrook married Sallie Hull, whose mother's maiden name was Allen supposed to be the granddaughter of Ethan Allen.

It is said the family of Andrew Westbrook, about February 1814 at Detroit, crossed in the winter on the ice; that horses and sleigh broke through; the family were saved, but Mrs. Westbrook died shortly after their arrival as a result of the exposure and drenching. She is buried in the cemetery at Ecorse just below Detroit.

ML P. & H.C., Vol. 15, p.589. Lt. Gen. Gordon Drumaond to Sir George Prevost contains A strong remonstrance from Lie against the incendiary system which appears likely to prevail to the westward, and more particularly against the burning of Westbrook's home and offices at Delaware, headed by himself, and the seizure of Messrs. Brigham and Springer from thence, who with Lt. Col. Baby and another were shamefully tied with cords until the enemy found it convenient to carry them off. Your Excellency may perhaps judge it advisable to make a representation on these subjects to the commander-in-chief of the United States Army or the American Government. I have the honor to be Sir Your Excellency's most Obedient and Humble servant, Gordon Drummond Lt. General.

A recent news item from Fort Huron, Michigan, reads: Business District of Old Fort Gratiot Disappearing to Make Room for Bridge, What is left of the old business district of the village of Fort Gratiot is rapidly giving way to the demands of modern transportation. State street, then Michigan street, east of Gratiot avenue, then Huron avenue, was the important business area of the village in the latter (Continue with newspaper clipping).

State street was known as Michigan street when the village of fort Gratiot was in its heyday. In 1796, the United States government took possession of the land on which the village and the military fort were later established. Before that time, a few Frenchmen had settled on the land, W. L. Jenks, St. Clair county historian, said today. By a congressional act of 180?, anyone who could prove possession of the land in 1796 could keep it. Pierre Bonhomme, one of the French settlers, took up one claim, which included the property north of what is now State street and on which the brodge substructure will be erected. A syndicate, organized by Charles Butler, well known New York lawyer, purchased the Bonhomme claim, which had been sold to Charles Larned and later to Andrew Westbrook. Westbrook sold it to the United States government in 1833. In 1840, the syndicate divided the property into small plats, which were distributed among the stockholders.


An Account of the Division of all Real &
Personal Property of Capt. Andrew Westbrook.

An inventory and a description of certain lots and land together with certain personal that has been divided equally among the whole of the heirs of Andrew Westbrook late of the town of China, County of St. Clair, Territory of Michigan.

lst. A certain lot in the township of China, County St, Clair, Territory, Michigan, containing 96 acres called the Dart farm, formerly and afterwards sold to James & Charles Atkins and Rebought March 20th, 1835 and the produce. . . $508.

2nd. The prarie lot west of Bell River, town of China, 8't County, M. T. Described as follows: Et of the N.E. 1/4 of See. No. 1 in Township No. 4 N. of Range No. 15 E. containing 79 acres 74/100 of an acre. . .$201.

3rd. An article against Beard & Wes of Bell River on 93 acres 113 of an acre of land or the money that is to be paid theron. . . $284.90

4th. The lot that was bought of Henry Crop in the town of Desmond suppose to contain 7 acres to Wt. Westbrook. . .$220.

5th. A prarie lot in township of Clay being the E. half of S.E. 1/4 of Sec. No. 24 in township of Clay being the E, half of S. E. , of Sec. No. 24 in township No. 3 N. of Range No. 15 t. containing 80 acres to Chester Kimball. . .$170.

6th. One lot being the S.W. qtr of the S.E. qtr of Sac, No. 24 in township No. 3 of Range No. 15 E containing 40 acres to Chester Kimball. . . $26.

7th. Lot in township of Clay, M.T. with the incumberances of Jones Clark & his wife to Lease on the same the tern of his or her natural life and with the incumbrances of one hundred $ to be paid to John Jackson for clearing 10 acres of the same land described as follows West half of the S.E. qtr of Sec. No. 19 in township No. 3 N. of Range 16 E containing 80 acres. . . $200.

8th. One lot in the Township of Clay to Henrietta Westbrook, County of St. Clair, M.T. being the West half of S. West Qtr of Sec. No. 19 in Township No. 3 North of Range 17 containing 80 acres to Henrietta Wesbrook. . . $122.

9th. One qr. section in township of Desmond the same being the N.E. qr of Sec. No. 19 in township No. 7 N. of Range 16 E. containing 160 acres to John H. Wesbrook. $250.

10th. The Gilbert Eliot farm in township of Desmond, M.T. to John H. Wesbrook containing 17 acres. $140.

________________________________
Total of Real Property value. . . $2121.90


Date at China November 7th, 1835 Andrew H. Wesbrook Ebenezer Wesbrook llth. one lot in township of Clay being the E. half of S.E. qr. of Sec. No. 19 in township No..3 N. of range No. 16 E containing 80 acres
Henrietta Westbrook. . . $207.

83.5 lb. nails at 111 9.59,
- 1 barn door lock at .75,
6 lbs. Y.h. tea 5.25,
3.5 barrels salt 10.37
3 M shingles 4.00
28 26 ft. boards 20 24.00
24 cords wood on the bank of Bell river 9.00
Part of barrel oil 5.00
9 cows and calves 181.00
3 mares and colts 110.00
1 cow 20.00
1 pr. Muley oxen 58.00
1 pr, stags 45.00
1 pr. bulls 19.00
1 seed horse 62.00
1 seed colt 62.00
1 Gray mare 50.00
l horse colt 21.00
1 Brown mare colt 28.00
1 Sorrel mare colt 23.50
1 Gray mare colt 20.00
1 Bay mare colt 10,00
1 Muley nosed colt 37.25
1 Yoke oxen 45.00
1 blue vest 2.00
2 pr. Satinette pantaloons & vest .60
2 qr. augers .37 1/2
2 prs. pants 1.00
2 pair drawers l undershirt .75
6 shirts 3.68
5 pr socks 1.00
2.5 lock & speck .09
1 pr. calf boots 3.50
1 pr, thin calf shoes 1.50
old shoes & boots .872
1 gun 5.00
1 powder horn 2.62 1/2
1 pr. pistols 1.00
1 dirk .06 1/4
1 sword .62 1/2
1 string belle 1.00
1 box paint & 1 pail paint 52.37
7 ox shoes .13
1 box rosin ,372
1 neck yoke .50
1 vice. 37.5
1/3 barrel soap 1.62
1 barrel soap 5.00
1 axe .25
1 iron wedge & 6# iron .3$
1 coarse comb .15
1 pail .04
2 cart saddles 8
1 plough mole .27
1 basket .25
1 lot old ox yokes $.12 1/2
1 lot forks & rakes .50
1 hat .19
1 saddle 12.5
1 pr, sheep shears .50
1 ink stand .13
1 draw knife .50
1 knive .37
1 tool chest .90
1 hand saw .12
1 clock 1.62
1 bellows 5.00
1 axe .50
3 pieces calico .87 1/2
1 saddle 9.00
1 side saddle 8.00
1 bridle .872
2 buffalo robes 8.50
1 trap 1.50
12 empty barrels & cags 4.50
1 clever. 0.5
________________________________
(total as is given) $3637.84 1/2.


An Inventory of certain property & notes

2000 feet of pine timber in Pine River $80.00
Notes & demands against Pieces Timberlands to the Amt of 404.89 1/2
Receipts against Lieutenant Eaton for beef 22.92
In the hands of A H Westbrppk Recd of William T. Westbrook 28.00
A H Westbrook Rec of Wm T Westbrook - this amount being a balance due on twelve head of beef turned to the government 127.00
A judgment at Esq. Halls China against Jno Hennely 666.49
do - do - against E. Linsday 19.00
In the hands of Carlisle Desmond To tan at the 1/2 & the 1/12 Twenty hides 40.00
Execution in Chamberlins hands against Preston 9.00
25 geese 10.00 Said to be 100 $ due from Ins Drew Detroit 100.00
Six beef hides in Tanery at Greenfield Desmond On shares 12.00
15 dollar note against Bagley
5 dollar account against Greenfield -
Accounts against Sundry 20.00
Individuals that appear to be due on account against fields for about 62 tons of hay cut on the home farm 372.00
Supposed to be 300 bushels of oats in the sheaf 75.00
140 bushels of wheat in barn not thrashed- supposed to be 105.00
Supposed to be 300 bu. corn 4/- 75.00
Supposed to be 350 bu, potatoes 2/- 77.00
Supposed to be 60 bu. wheat on the Tebot farm in stack 45.00
Garden sauce sqn 48 dollars worth 48.00
Supposed to be 8 bu. in stack of beans 8f- 8.00
Supposed to be 12 tons Hay on the Thebot farm 72.00
-------------------------
(as is given) 1925.04


The silver mounted powder horn of Andrew Westbrook was given him by his Company of Rangers and bears the inscription:

When this you see remember
me let this be our endeavor
that we may never disagree
but keep true friends forever.

Detroit 1816.


Known Westbrook Decendants


Last updated August 30, 2006 by Dale C Jones